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Sean Connery, the Scotsman who was plucked from obscurity and offered the role of secret agent James Bond, bringing Ian Fleming's character to life and igniting an Academy Award-winning career, has died at 90. Connery died peacefully overnight in the Bahamas, his son Jason told @bbcnews. Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon tweeted that the nation "mourns one of her best loved sons." In a statement released through the franchise, Daniel Craig, the current Bond, said Connery "defined an era and a style. The wit and charm he portrayed on screen could be measured in mega watts; he helped create the modern blockbuster." In 1964, when the third installment 'Goldfinger' released, TIME praised Connery as an anti-celebrity: "Bond is phony and Connery is not." In this photograph, Connery—whose career included seven Bond films and an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 'The Untouchables,' poses as Bond in a scene from 'Diamonds Are Forever,' in Las Vegas in 1971. "Bond seems to grow more resilient with age," TIME wrote in a review. "Since 1962 and his first screen incarnation in 'Dr. No,' several wars, untold natural disasters and the Beatles have all come and gone. Bond looks better than ever, partly because Sean Connery has returned to play him." Photograph by Donaldson Collection/Michael Ochs Archives/@gettyimages
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There are a lot of reasons why Sarah Cooper (@sarahcpr) doesn't want to lip-sync President Trump anymore. For one, she's "very, very hopeful" that Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden will win the 2020 election. But on a more personal level, the Jamaican-American comedian—who left her job at Google in 2014 to pursue comedy—is ready to show the world that her talents extend beyond that particular shtick. Cooper's new Netflix comedy special, Everything's Fine, directed by Natasha Lyonne and executive produced by Maya Rudolph, debuted Oct. 27. "There are all these things that I'd kind of given up on being able to see presented to a wider audience," she says. "Those dreams are coming true now." Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @celestesloman
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As Nigeria's protests calling for an end to police brutality and the dissolution of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (or SARS) police unit swelled this month, women were at the forefront. Among them was Aisha Yesufu, a co-organizer of the Bring Back Our Girls movement, which called for the safe return of the Chibok schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram in 2014. The 46-year-old is proud of the young women who have mobilized during these demonstrations, writes Suyin Haynes. "The Bring Back Our Girls movement was a protest of empathy. #EndSARS is more about survival," says Yesufu, photographed in Abuja on Oct. 10. More than a week later, according to an @amnesty investigation, security forces fatally shot peaceful protesters in Lagos. (The military has denied reports that its troops opened fire.) "These are young men and women who are being killed by those who are supposed to protect them," Yesufu adds, "and who are fighting for their life." Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @etinosa.yvonne
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Workers pick corn in the pre-dawn hours to avoid the heat of the day in California's San Joaquin Valley on Aug. 21. Climate change is facilitating record-breaking heat spells; fires are raging every season in part due to poor forest management; and many employers are resigned to COVID-19 lingering through the start of next year's planting season. Once a land of bounty, the Golden State has turned into an unrelenting minefield of obstacles that have exposed the many flaws of an entire ecosystem. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @brianlfrank@nytimes/@reduxpictures
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Katowice ranks among the most polluted cities in Europe, and locals complain about the low air quality. Even so, many here aren't ready to let go of the natural resource that has powered Poland's economy since the Industrial Revolution. Culture in the province of Silesia developed around the coal mines, from the soccer clubs sponsored by the mining companies to the local festivals they supported. Strikes at Silesian coal mines—like this one, photographed in 1978—played a key role in the uprising that brought democracy to Poland in the 1980s. Today, the mines still occupy a place of reverence to many of the region's residents, reports Justin Worland. Katowice may seem like an odd place to look to understand the future of the European Union. But as the E.U. seeks to turn its recovery from the coronavirus pandemic into a moment to pivot to a greener future, this city and myriad others built upon a fossil-fuel economy face a reckoning. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by Michał Cała
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Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the Supreme Court along a near party-line Senate vote on Oct. 26, marking President Trump's third justice on the court and cementing its strong conservative majority just over one week before Election Day. With a 52-to-48 vote, Republicans confirmed Barrett for a lifetime appointment without the support of a single Democrat. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine was the only Republican to vote against Barrett, who fills the seat left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the liberal icon who died in September. In a ceremony at the White House, Barrett was sworn in by Justice Clarence Thomas. The speed of the confirmation process, the stakes for the balance of power on the Supreme Court and the proximity to the Nov. 3 elections are expected to motivate voters on both sides of the aisle to express their support or dismay over the outcome at the ballot box. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @bsmialowski and Nicholas Kamm— @afpphoto/@gettyimages
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Rather than battle scenes between Armenia and Azerbaijan in Nagorno-Karabakh, photographer Emanuele Satolli's images capture the eerie quiet. In one photograph, dust blankets the yard of a shelled house in Stepanakert, the regional capital. Another shows an Armenian soldier sitting inside a vehicle near the town of Karmir Shuka. In a third image, strings of empty ration cans hang in a frontline trench near the town of Askeran. Last, flowers rest on the grave of an Armenian soldier. Read more about Europe's oldest "frozen war," and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by @emanuelesatolli
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While the roots of what's often known as Europe's oldest "frozen war" in Nagorno-Karabakh date back to the early 20th century, the land war erupted after the fall of the Soviet Union. A 1994 ceasefire left Armenia in de-facto control of the territory, which the international community regards as being within Azerbaijan. Although the conflict has been mostly dormant since then, the dispute at its core was never resolved. Since fighting restarted on Sept. 27, hundreds of soldiers and more than 100 civilians have been reported killed. Read more and see more pictures at the link in bio. In this photograph: Ashot Sarkissian, 51, walks on a hill near the town of Askeran where an alleged Azerbaijani drone was shot down in October. Photograph by @emanuelesatolli
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Perhaps more than any other city, Tokyo bet big on 2020. Japan's capital had ear-marked $12.6 billion for hosting an Olympic Games that would rejuvenate run-down neighborhoods and turbocharge the country's tourism industry. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit, postponing the Games and throwing the city's plans into uncertainty. Despite spiraling costs, Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike says her city is ready for next year's rescheduled Games and sees opportunities to leverage the crisis to improve governance. Asked how infrastructure needs such as public transport are being reassessed, she says: "This is a good opportunity to redesign Tokyo from a city filled with automobiles to a city arranged around people." Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by Kenji Chiga (@chigaa) for TIME
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For the past six years, Brittany Schultz has been a kindergarten teacher in the Denver public school system. On May 28, she left, and on June 15, she opened Ms. Brittany's Village day care in her home in Commerce City, Colo., with her three children and one from another family. Within two months of opening, Schultz says she was making the same money as she had made in a classroom but was responsible for only nine kids. A perfect storm has landed on the childcare landscape, whipped up by the twin fronts of fear and opportunity, writes Belinda Luscombe (@sal_gaddo). Many parents, spooked by the potential for COVID-19 infection at big centers, and no longer necessarily commuting to work, are looking for smaller, more local options for their children, especially those that will take siblings of different ages. Millennials, raised in the sharing economy, already regard domestic space as multipurpose. Teachers like Schultz, alarmed by the prospects of either teaching entirely online, or contagion in schools, are looking for another way to work. People suddenly need jobs. And governments and employers have come to realize that without childcare, their workforce is significantly less productive. The expensive on-site office childcare centers sit empty while employees stagger under the double load of parenting and working from home. Everyone's looking for new solutions. Read more about the rise of the "Carebnb" at the link in bio. Photographs by @rachelwoolfphoto for TIME
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"Normal. That's a word for what so many of us long for as this incessant pandemic drags on, the end seemingly further away with every passing day. Yet, normal is nowhere to be found in the circus of Washington pandemic politics, of desperate economic crisis, and the surging threat of white supremacist violence. Nowhere, apparently, but college football," @nkalamb, @derekcrim and @jojomellis, the hosts of @endofsportpod, write in a TIME Ideas column. "Because, despite the genuine concern initially offered this summer at the prospect of playing college football in the context of a global health crisis, somehow here we are, college football on the television and in the stadiums, and no one seemingly batting an eyelash. Yet, if you look closely, what you see is that universities are right now subjecting unpaid athletic workers to precisely the same health risks that are eliciting such outrage every day on network television and social media. The difference with college football? There is nary the commensurate concern." Read more at the link in bio. In this photograph: socially distanced groups of fans during a game between the Arkansas Razorbacks and the Ole Miss Rebels in Fayetteville, Ark., on Oct. 17. Photograph by Wesley Hitt (@nwaproductions)— @gettyimages
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Up and down the West Coast, farmers are reeling from a hellish summer of consecutive and overlapping crises. First, COVID-19 spread across the country, endangering the lives of farmworkers who were deemed as essential and devastating the restaurant market. Record-breaking hot stretches, which made this August the hottest one on record in California, burnt crops and decreased yields. Then a new wave of fires descended across the forests and hills, displacing workers, demolishing homes and blanketing regions with stifling smoke. While some might chalk up these events to a series of freakish aberrations, writes Andrew R. Chow, there are signs that none of these crises will disappear anytime soon. Read more at the link in bio. In this photograph: a burned Christmas Tree farm near Gates, Ore., in September. Photograph by @pvanagtmael@magnumphotos
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The architecture world has been called slow to respond to climate change. But over the past few years, architects, builders and designers have increasingly recognized the responsibility they bear. @bjarkeingels' buildings are famous for centering a single big headline-grabbing idea and his most famous project may be CopenHill: a 279-ft.-tall power plant in the Danish capital, where trash is burned to generate low-carbon energy in a process so clean that his firm could place a ski slope on top. The building finally opened to the public in October 2019, with a positive reception from users and reviewers. Acknowledging the critique of Ingels' work as "a bit flashy and a bit trashy," the Observer's Rowan Moore said the project lived up to the hype: "This is a work well matched to its architects' strengths. Nicety is not really the thing in this [old industrial area]; a compelling idea is. Plus a dollop of chutzpah." Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @lucalocatelliphoto@instituteartist
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Over the past decade, @bjarkeingels has gone from the enfant terrible of architecture—known for head-turning innovations like a mountain-shaped apartment block or a pair of twisting towers in Miami—to one of the busiest architects in the world. Ingels' next project is a plan to save the world. When architects lay out a city block or a neighborhood, they often create a master plan: a document identifying the problems that need to be addressed, proposing solutions and creating an image of the future that all parties involved then work toward. In Masterplanet, Bjarke Ingels Group—fittingly known as BIG—applies that thinking to the entire earth, laying out how we can redesign the planet to cut greenhouse emissions, protect resources and adapt to climate change, writes Ciara Nugent. Climate-justice activists, who argue that climate action needs to address not only emissions but also systemic inequalities, question Ingels' right to draft a plan for the entire planet, as well as his ability. Fellow architects say the industry's focus needs to be on tasks like improving the energy efficiency of buildings, not on flashy planetary vision boards. For Ingels, photographed in 2016, none of that is a reason not to start one. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @paridukovic@trunkarchive
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TIME's new International cover: The Great Reset. The COVID-19 pandemic has provided a unique opportunity to think about the kind of future we want. "How can we seize this moment of disruption to push for a world that is healthier, more resilient, sustainable and just?" writes Edward Felsenthal, the Editor-in-Chief and CEO of TIME. "What do all of us—individuals, businesses and governments—need to do to ensure that we don't simply revert to what was before?" We partnered with the @worldeconomicforum to ask leading thinkers to share ideas for how to transform the way we live and work. Read more at the link in bio. Illustration by Spooky Pooka for TIME
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If President Trump's task during the Oct. 22 debate was to dig out of the hole he's created for himself, former Vice President Joe Biden simply needed a solid performance to hang on to his lead. "It's not about Biden or anything really he's doing. He's just showing that he's an alternative who has a pulse," says Ron Bonjean, a Republican strategist. "You could run a pile of bricks next to Trump and have a large segment of the population voting for a pile of bricks." Biden's performance seemed unlikely to damage his standing. He often turned toward the camera, at one point telling voters to "look at us closely," and pitched a vote for him as a vote for "decency, honor and respect," arguing that "the character of the country is on the ballot." Trump scoffed in response. "Don’t give me the stuff about how you're an innocent baby," he said. Read more at the link in bio. In these photographs: Trump supporters watch the debate outside Great American Pizza and Subs in Golden Valley, Ariz., and people watch from their vehicles at Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture in San Francisco. Photographs by @arianadrehsler@afpphoto/@gettyimages and Jeff Chiu (@jchiu34)— @apnews
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President Trump met former Vice President Joe Biden in Nashville on Oct. 22 for the second and final televised debate of this election. The backdrop of a global pandemic, a sour economy and the ongoing national reckoning over racial injustice were among the issues that took center stage. Trump has seen the campaign slip further from his grip as his campaign funds have dried up and poll numbers have gone south. Biden is coasting on a comfortable lead, even as his own campaign manager warns nothing is certain with a little more than a week of voting to go. The debate was far more civil, due in no small part to the liberal use of mute on the candidates' mics, but it still got heated as the evening progressed and Trump found his footing under the new rules. Even though the candidates covered far more policy ground than they did at their last meeting, the debate isn't likely to have had much persuasive value. Few voters are truly undecided at this point, and at least 40 million people have already cast their votes. Instead, both candidates worked to fire up their bases to get their supporters out to the polls. Read about the key moments at the link in bio. Photograph by Chip Somodevilla (@somophoto)— @gettyimages
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Today, @felixandpaul and TIME Studios released the first of four episodes in the immersive series Space Explorers: The ISS Experience, chronicling the lives of astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Episode One, "ADAPT," was filmed entirely on board the ISS. In collaboration with @nasa, @canadianspaceagency and @issnationallab, it is the most ambitious project ever filmed in space. Read more about how to watch at the link in bio.
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On Oct. 16, 1962, President John F. Kennedy awoke to a political and security nightmare. At 9 a.m., McGeorge Bundy, his National Security Adviser, informed him that a U-2 reconnaissance mission over Cuba had photographed Soviet medium-range ballistic missiles, nuclear-capable weapons with a range of 1,200 miles. In public and private statements, Premier Nikita Khrushchev had stated that he sent only defensive armaments to Cuba, and during a press conference in September the President had warned Khrushchev that the U.S. would not tolerate offensive weapons. But Bundy's report made it clear that Khrushchev had deceived him. Meeting that morning with 14 handpicked advisers, Kennedy agreed that the missiles would have to be bombed and Cuba invaded. But a week later, on Oct. 22, he announced his decision to "quarantine" (blockade) Cuba as the first move to force Khrushchev to withdraw his missiles. That evening, in a California department store, people were photographed watching the President's announcement. It was a tortured decision, writes history professor and author Martin J. Sherwin. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by Ralph Crane—The @LIFE Picture Collection/@gettyimages
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This past year, Democratic and Republican lawyers have filed hundreds of election-related lawsuits in state and federal courts, putting this election on track to become the most litigated in history. One reason for the deluge is COVID-19, which compelled most states to expand access to absentee and mail-in voting, add ballot drop boxes, or tweak deadlines and other requirements. Nearly every time states have implemented a change, it's been followed by a lawsuit, reports Alana Abramson. There have been at least 380 election-related lawsuits solely stemming from the pandemic, according to the Stanford-MIT Healthy Elections Project. Ned Foley, an election law expert at Ohio State University, has described this year as "a litigation arms race." Read more about why the 2020 election could come down to the courts at the link in bio. Photograph by @gabezim
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